Center for Fluid Mechanics

Seminars

Presentations from students, postdocs and faculty, resident and visiting, covering topics from every corner of fluid mechanics and soft matter, from nano fluids to atmospheric flows and everything inbetween.

  • Virtual

    Fluids Seminar: Georgios ‘Yorgos’ Katsikis, MIT

    Location: via Zoom
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    Center for Fluid Mechanics Seminar Series

    Title: Inertial and viscous flywheel sensing of nanoparticles

    Abstract: I will present two problems where hydrodynamic interactions between particles and microchannel walls reveal intriguing physics, and enable applications for sensing the physical properties of particles. First, I explore the interplay between inertial and viscous hydrodynamic effects on a particle suspended in fluid between rotating walls. Combining theory and experiments, I harness these effects to do triple measurement of single-particle mass, volume and density. I intuitively explain the fluid-particle interaction. Paradoxically, when viscous effects become dominant over inertia, particle inertia becomes relevant. A viscosity-driven hydrodynamic coupling turns the particle into a ‘viscous flywheel’. Second, I use a similar concept at the nanoscale to measure the DNA cargo of Adeno-Associated viruses (AAV), which are commonly engineered to deliver therapeutic DNA in gene therapy. Through experiments and advection-diffusion simulations of AAV particles, I demonstrate real-time mass measurement of their DNA cargo as a promising tool for quality control in AAV manufacturing.

  • Virtual

    Fluids Seminar: Sarah Olson, WPI

    Location: via Zoom
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    Center for Fluid Mechanics Seminar Series

    Title: Sperm navigation in complex environments

    Abstract: Microorganisms can swim in a variety of environments, interacting with chemicals and other proteins in the fluid. In this talk, we will highlight recent computational methods and results for swimming efficiency and hydrodynamic interactions of swimmers in different fluid environments. Sperm are modeled via a centerline representation where forces are solved for using elastic rod theory. The method of regularized Stokeslets is used to solve the fluid-structure interaction where emergent swimming speeds can be compared to asymptotic analysis. In the case of fluids with extra proteins or cells that may act as friction, swimming speeds may be enhanced and attraction may not occur. We will also highlight how parameter estimation techniques can be utilized to infer fluid and/or swimmer properties.